This blog is dedicated to The Cousins' War book series by Philippa Gregory.
The tv series The White Queen BBC One aired June 16.

-Blog created: 8 June 2013-

let’s tell a tale of dead kings: englishmonarchs depicted on television (1377 - 1603) [part two of two]

February 6, 2014
Is it possible for you to upload the Faye onset interview on the BBC One website? Since I'm in the US, I can't view it. :(

Sorry i am not from the uk either!

January 16, 2014

my feet have lead my straight into my grave

December 9, 2013
December 3, 2013

All of you will dance to whatever tune I sing

November 17, 2013

The White Queen ~ The Price of Power + scenery

November 6, 2013
November 2, 2013
October 25, 2013

fuckyeahaneurinbarnard:

King Richard, alone, was killed fighting manfully in the thickest press of his enemies

October 20, 2013
October 19, 2013

I sent the ring from the giveaway a long time ago, i’d love to know if she got it, i tried to messaged her after i sent it but she changed her url so i cant reach her.

October 14, 2013

somosinevitables:

The White Queen - Behind the scenes pictures of episode 7

October 10, 2013
October 8, 2013
a-rose-or-two:

highgardns:

H I S T O R Y  M E M E  |  4 / 9 M O N A R C H S → Edward IV Of (1442 - 1483)
Edward was born on 28 April 1442 at Rouen in France, the son of Richard Plantagenet, Duke of York. Edward’s father was the leading Yorkist in the dynastic struggle against the Lancastrians known as the Wars of the Roses, which began in 1455. When Richard Plantagenet was killed at the Battle of Wakefield in 1460, Edward inherited his claim. With the support of the powerful Earl of Warwick, known as ‘the Kingmaker’, Edward defeated the Lancastrians in a series of battles, culminating in the Battle of Towton in 1461. With the Lancastrian king, Henry VI, overthrown, Edward was crowned Edward IV.
Warwick believed he could continue to control the new king. He was keen to negotiate a foreign marriage for Edward, but in 1464 Edward secretly married Elizabeth Woodville, a commoner. Warwick was furious at the favours now shown to Elizabeth’s relatives and allied himself to Edward’s brother George, Duke of Clarence, leading a revolt against the king. Warwick and Clarence then fled to France, where they joined Margaret of Anjou, wife of Henry VI. Margaret’s Lancastrian army invaded England in September 1470. Edward fled to the Netherlands until March 1471, when he and his brother Richard, Duke of Gloucester, returned to England. Edward defeated and killed Warwick at Barnet before defeating the Lancastrians at Tewkesbury in May. Henry VI was put to death in the Tower of London.
The second part of Edward’s reign, from 1471 to 1483, was a period of relative peace and security. He used income from the Crown Estates to pay governmental costs, and was therefore less in need of parliamentary grants than his predecessors - he called parliament only six times. Commercial treaties, external peace and internal order revived trade, benefiting customs duties and other revenues. Councils were set up to govern in the Marches of Wales and in the north.
Edward died on 9 April 1483. His young sons, Edward and Richard, were left in the protection of their uncle Richard, Duke of Gloucester. (x)

Just like to add that he was the first monarch since Henry II, who died in 1190, to die without being in debt.

a-rose-or-two:

highgardns:

H I S T O R Y  M E M E  |  4 / 9 M O N A R C H S  Edward IV Of (1442 - 1483)

Edward was born on 28 April 1442 at Rouen in France, the son of Richard Plantagenet, Duke of York. Edward’s father was the leading Yorkist in the dynastic struggle against the Lancastrians known as the Wars of the Roses, which began in 1455. When Richard Plantagenet was killed at the Battle of Wakefield in 1460, Edward inherited his claim. With the support of the powerful Earl of Warwick, known as ‘the Kingmaker’, Edward defeated the Lancastrians in a series of battles, culminating in the Battle of Towton in 1461. With the Lancastrian king, Henry VI, overthrown, Edward was crowned Edward IV.

Warwick believed he could continue to control the new king. He was keen to negotiate a foreign marriage for Edward, but in 1464 Edward secretly married Elizabeth Woodville, a commoner. Warwick was furious at the favours now shown to Elizabeth’s relatives and allied himself to Edward’s brother George, Duke of Clarence, leading a revolt against the king. Warwick and Clarence then fled to France, where they joined Margaret of Anjou, wife of Henry VI. Margaret’s Lancastrian army invaded England in September 1470. Edward fled to the Netherlands until March 1471, when he and his brother Richard, Duke of Gloucester, returned to England. Edward defeated and killed Warwick at Barnet before defeating the Lancastrians at Tewkesbury in May. Henry VI was put to death in the Tower of London.

The second part of Edward’s reign, from 1471 to 1483, was a period of relative peace and security. He used income from the Crown Estates to pay governmental costs, and was therefore less in need of parliamentary grants than his predecessors - he called parliament only six times. Commercial treaties, external peace and internal order revived trade, benefiting customs duties and other revenues. Councils were set up to govern in the Marches of Wales and in the north.

Edward died on 9 April 1483. His young sons, Edward and Richard, were left in the protection of their uncle Richard, Duke of Gloucester. (x)

Just like to add that he was the first monarch since Henry II, who died in 1190, to die without being in debt.

 
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